Uncategorized

Welcome!

Welcome to mikeleejazz.com. This our update for fall 2020. With the summer of 2020, we have a whole host of updates. I just gave the whole site a face-lift and added a couple of new performances from quarantine. My big project this summer has been releasing my Jazz To College Comprehensive Course. It’s a step by step guide to tackling all the hurdles for high school seniors, college seniors, and transfer applicants who are applying to college or graduate school as a jazz studies or jazz-related applicant. Please have a look around, watch some video, read an article, and subscribe to our newsletter!

Please take a moment and subscribe to our newsletter:

Connect on Social Media:

Click on any link below:

June is Jumpin’

June is packed with musical events with some of my favorite musicians. We’re staying local for most of the month, so if you’re in the New Jersey/New York area – please stop through to one (or more) of these gigs!

June Itinerary:
June 1 (Sat) Candlelight Lounge w/ Peter Lin 3:30-7:30
June 1 (Sat) Bemelman’s Bar with Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 5 Wednesday Jam Brown Bear Pub
June 6 (Thurs) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 7 (Friday) Clement’s Place w/Nat Adderley Jr. 7:30 
June 8 (Sat) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 11 (Tues) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 12 (Wed) Bemelman’s Bar w/Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 12 (Wed) Wednesday Jam Brown Bear Pub Featuring Bruce Williams 8 pm – 11:45 pm
June 13 (Thurs) Bemelman’s Bar w/Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 14 (Fri) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 15 (Sat) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 16 (Sun) Jazz Standard Mike Lee Family Affair 12:30 -2
June 18 (Tues) Smalls with Frank Lacy 10:30 – 1:00
June 19 (Wed) Bemelman’s Bar w/Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 20 (Thurs) Bemelman’s Bar w/Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 21 (Fri) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 22 (Sat) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 23 (Sun) Judy Garland show Paramount Asbury 7p
June 25 (Tues) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 26 (Wed) Django w/ Josh Evans Big Band 
June 27 (Thurs) Bemelman’s Bar w/Loston Harris 9:30 – 12:30
June 28 (Fri) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00
June 29 (Sat) Bemelman’s Bar w/ Loston Harris 9:30 – 1:00

Venue Information:

Bemelman’s Bar at the Carlyle Hotel
35 E 76th St, New York, NY 10021
(212) 744-1600

Clement’s Place
15 Washington St, Newark, NJ 07102
(973) 923-0340

Jazz Standard
116 E 27th St, New York, NY 10016
(212) 576-2232

The Django
2 6th Ave, New York, NY 10013
(212) 519-6649

Brown Bear Pub:
104 Harrison Ave
West Orange, NJ

March/April

March ended on a high note as we accelerate into busy season!

Dave Stryker Quartet March 30th

After our CD release at Dizzy’s, I was thrilled to come back home to Montclair last Saturday night and play with Dave Stryker at our local landmark, Trumpets Jazz Club. It was Dave’s birthday celebration and the place was filled to the rafters! It was exciting to play for so many friends and neighbors. Dave is churning out more great music and has already recorded two albums this year which are due for release this spring. I had fun helping him work up the music for these releases and was delighted to perform much of this music at Trumpets. Trumpets has been a vital part of our musical culture and I was saddened to learn that it has been put up for sale. Here’s hoping the new owners take up the mantle of Kristine Massari and Enrico Granafei and keep presenting world-class jazz music.

This weekend I’m looking forward to performing again with the legendary pianist/composer and former musical director for Luther Vandross, Nat Adderley Jr. Saturday April 6th at 2 pm at the Montclair Museum of Art.

Sunday, I’ll be in Morristown for the New Jersey Jazz Society 50th Annual Pee Wee Russell Memorial Stomp at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. First I’ll be directing my Jazz House Kids Ambassadors ensemble at noon, then joining Andy Farber and a a great line up of saxophonist for a battle royal at 1:15.

Then Wednesday is my birthday celebration at Small’s Jazz Club in New York City. Smalls is one of the greatest jazz clubs in the world and I’m excited to celebrate with my trio – Ed Howard on bass, and Alvester Garnett on drums plus added guest Julian Lee on Saxophone. Thursday the same band will make it’s way to New Brunswick and the New Brunswick Jazz Project’s Thursday night at the Hyatt. Later this month the Loston Harris Trio begins it’s spring residency at Bemelman’s Bar at the Carlyle Hotel. See the full April Calendar here

March and April are decision time and I’m so excited for my students who have successfully auditioned at The Juilliard School, New England Conservatory, Manhattan School of Music, and many other fine institutions. It’s been a banner year for the students of Jazz House Kids!

Applying to Music School

Last night I had the immense pleasure of giving my annual college talk at Jazz House Kids. The organization calls this “Jazz House Kids goes to college – part I” and offers it to all of our high school juniors and seniors and their parents. I started doing this about 5 years ago after my son, Julian, with lots of parental assistance, successfully managed his entrance to The Juilliard School. Helping Julian with all of his applications, navigating all the various deadlines, applying for financial aid, and  negotiating for more scholarship than was initially offered, was one of the most stressful endeavors of my life. This being our oldest child, it was our first experience of this entire process and we frankly felt bewildered and overwhelmed by the task. Once we were through this very complex process and had succeeded in achieving our goal I decided to try to pass on our hard won knowledge to the next class of parents, and have done so each year since then.

While my experience as a parent is the most important of my qualifications, I have also helped many other private students and Jazz House participants with their successful applications to Juilliard, Manhattan School of Music, Berklee, William Paterson, Northwestern, University of Miami, Rutgers, Oberlin Conservatory, and other schools. Additionally, as an adjunct professor at Montclair State University, I have been part of the process of auditioning and recruiting high school students to our program. And yet with all this experience I still don’t hold myself as an “expert” on the topic, but at least I can help parents and prospective students with a list of good questions to ask. Every year, I am asked questions that make me think about the topic in new ways and I’m usually given some useful information from the parents in the audience who have gone through this with an older child.

The general topics covered last night were:

  • Determining which schools are best for you
  • What schools are looking for in a prospective student
  • Developing a college requirement spreadsheet
  • Prescreening audition tapes
  • Live audition preparation and timelines
  • Scholarship and financial aid

Here are some important tips from my workshop:

  • Even the most conscientious, organized, dutiful student needs HELP navigating this process. It’s overwhelming, it requires reminders of multiple deadlines for EACH school. Set up reminders in a calendar app that will keep you on track with all of the dates for submission. If you apply to 8 schools (a recommended number) and they each have 5 due dates to track, that’s 40 dates to remember.
  • Make a spreadsheet. It will have about 10 columns with all the deadlines: deadline for university application, deadline for music school application (yes many schools require separate applications), deadline for pre-screening, submission, deadline for scheduling interview/school visit, financial aid deadline, FAFSA deadline. Additional columns will contain contact info for the admissions department, Director of Jazz Studies, instrumental teacher contact, tune requirements, and more.
  • Don’t take on huge debt. I cannot imagine starting life as a musician with a quarter million dollars of school debt. Go where they give you money.
  • Grades and test scores don’t have a huge influence on your admittance to a music school but may have a huge influence on non-music related funding available at a school. Universities usually have extra scholarships for high academic achievers.
  • All the advice we parents get about the importance of our children having a wide range of extra-curricular experience and community service doesn’t matter to music schools. I have found that these activities only detract from a music school applicants main job in high school – practice!!!
  • The most important thing a student needs to do to get into music school and receive scholarship is to practice. 3 to 4 hours a day minimum and hopefully even more than that when possible.
  • Narrow your pre-screening audition tape tune list to as few as possible to fulfill the requirements of all schools. Use your spreadsheet to figure out which tunes are necessary.
  • Hire young professional musicians to play on your audition tape. I know your friends are the greatest, but intros, endings, and other details are learned well only from EXPERIENCE and are going to be essential to making you sound your best.
  • Hire a producer for your session. Your private teacher or another trusted mentor can help manage how many takes of each tune are necessary and help keep the session flowing.
  • You don’t know what the auditioner is looking for. Play pretty, play soulfully, – you are probably not going to “impress” a college professor but you may turn one off by playing your hottest new lick and sacrificing time or artistic flow to do so.
  • The Financial aid process will kick your butt. It’s like filling out another tax return. Get advice and assistance from your financial advisor and accountant starting now and get all your ducks in a row. This is not the year you can file an extension.
  • Take each application and audition seriously. Even if you really don’t want to go to a particular school – the scholarship they offer you may work as a bargaining chip to get the scholarship you need from your first choice.
  • Scholarships are negotiable.
  • Schools don’t like to offer scholarships to students they think are not going to accept them. When negotiating make it clear to your first choice school that they are your first choice and if you receive the requested scholarship you will commit.
  • Don’t tell a school they are your first choice when they’re not, but you don’t need to advertise that you’ve got another favorite. Once you have accepted an offer from one school, let any other schools know that you are going elsewhere – this releases the other schools from any scholarship money they offered you and they can then offer that money to another student.